Podcast | Review And Instruction Suggestions For The Four Postures Meditations (Live Recordings From Two Insight Timer Live Events)

This is an edit of two 15 minute Insight Timer Live events at 11am and 11pm Central on November 10th about instruction suggestions for meditating with the four main postures of sitting, standing, lying down and walking. This was inspired by a request for walking meditation instructions during my recent months’ silent Insight Timer LiveContinue reading “Podcast | Review And Instruction Suggestions For The Four Postures Meditations (Live Recordings From Two Insight Timer Live Events)”

An Integrating Presence Meditation: Deeply Sensing Body Areas — Wednesday July 28, 2021 At Fat Cat Longevity

This meditation (recorded live) aims to strengthen and deepen the 32 Parts of the Body portion of Body Contemplation in the Four Foundations of Mindfulness — not meant as regular practice or substitute. Partial inspiration comes from this Four Foundations of Mindfulness visual:

“Just as if there were a double-mouthed provision bag full of various kinds of grain such as hill paddy, paddy, green gram, cow-peas, sesamum, and husked rice, and a man with sound eyes, having opened that bag, were to take stock of the contents thus: “This is hill paddy, this is paddy, this is green gram, this is cow-pea, this is sesamum, this is husked rice.” Just so, monks, a monk reflects on this very body enveloped by the skin and full of manifold impurity, from the soles up, and from the top of the head-hairs down, thinking thus: “There are in this body hair of the head, hair of the body, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, sinews, bones, marrow, kidney, heart, liver, midriff, spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, gorge, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, nasal mucus, synovial fluid, urine.” ~The Foundations of Mindfulness — Satipatthana Sutta

Dharma Questions: Miscellany — Part 2

This irregular “Dharma Questions” series deals with “dharma” meaning both the truth of the nature of reality and some Buddhist teachings. Amongst other things these questions can be:
• thought experiments
• borderline musings not meant to be answered
• from laziness of not contemplating or researching them yet

There’s more or less 17 questions. Here’s two:

Why do the Ānāpānasati instructions omit details on how to bring mindfulness to the fore and calm bodily formations?

What is the root condition (and causes) for (each of the) unwholesome roots of greed, ill-will and delusion (lobha, dosa, moha)?