Podcast | Studying And Practicing With “The Iddhipāda-Vibhaṅga Sutta — An Analysis Of The Bases Of Power”: Unpacking Hindrances And Another Translation Reading (2 of 7)

While I reference some non-Buddhist material most everything in the notes and podcasts for this series on The Iddhipāda-Vibhaṅga Sutta are solely my effort to relate considerations, questions, experiences, explorations, suggestions, interpretations and practices involved and associated with this sutta.

This series comes via seven categories/blog posts/podcasts:

  1. Introduction; the key encapsulation/encoding/summary paragraph of the whole sutta which includes and weaves in the four powers; and a reading of one of two translations for the sutta
  2. Unpacking of the hindrances and the other of two translations for the sutta
  3. A (type of) situational awareness
  4. 32 parts of the body
  5. Perceptions of night, daytime and light
  6. “Psychic Powers,” practice combinations and miscellany
  7. Summary, findings, observations and comparisons

In more detail, the four Iddhipāda — sometimes translated as bases of psychic power, bases of power, base of spiritual power, wings to success, or roads to power — are:

  1. chanda: desire; enthusiasm; purpose
  2. viriya: persistence; energy; effort; will
  3. citta: intent; consciousness; knowing mind; mental development; devoting mind to; heart-mind
  4. vīmaṃsā: investigation; inquiry; discernment; discrimination; interest; intelligent curiosity; [(perhaps a new contribution, or for chanda:) balanced and helpful enthrallment, fascination]; feedback and fine tuning, adjustment; learn from doing

Along with aiding our even mundane accomplishments and mastery, perhaps the Iddhipāda play a significant role in approaching will — the way one decides on and initiates action — and at the core of The Iddhipāda-Vibhaṅga Sutta is an analysis of will along with instructions for its training, development, and use.


As for this second part of the series here is the portion of the sutta addressing hindrances followed by my general notes I draw on for the podcast episode (with italics and bold and bracketed text usually added by me):

“And how is desire [chanda] overly sluggish? Whatever desire is accompanied by laziness, conjoined with laziness, that is called overly sluggish desire.

And how is desire overly active? Whatever desire is accompanied by restlessness, conjoined with restlessness, that is called overly active desire.

And how is desire inwardly constricted? Whatever desire is accompanied by sloth & drowsiness, conjoined with sloth & drowsiness, that is called inwardly restricted desire.

And how is desire outwardly scattered? Whatever desire is stirred up by the five strands of sensuality, outwardly dispersed & dissipated, that is called outwardly scattered desire.

And how is persistence [viriya] overly sluggish? Whatever persistence is accompanied by laziness, conjoined with laziness, that is called overly sluggish persistence.

And how is persistence overly active? Whatever persistence is accompanied by restlessness, conjoined with restlessness, that is called overly active persistence.

And how is persistence inwardly constricted? Whatever persistence is accompanied by sloth & drowsiness, conjoined with sloth & drowsiness, that is called inwardly restricted persistence.

And how is persistence outwardly scattered? Whatever persistence is stirred up by the five strands of sensuality, outwardly dispersed & dissipated, that is called outwardly scattered persistence.

And how is intent [citta] overly sluggish? Whatever intent is accompanied by laziness, conjoined with laziness, that is called overly sluggish intent.

And how is intent overly active? Whatever intent is accompanied by restlessness, conjoined with restlessness, that is called overly active intent.

And how is intent inwardly constricted? Whatever intent is accompanied by sloth & drowsiness, conjoined with sloth & drowsiness, that is called inwardly restricted intent.

And how is intent outwardly scattered? Whatever intent is stirred up by the five strands of sensuality, outwardly dispersed & dissipated, that is called outwardly scattered intent.

And how is discrimination [vīmaṃsā] overly sluggish? Whatever discrimination is accompanied by laziness, conjoined with laziness, that is called overly sluggish discrimination.

And how is discrimination overly active? Whatever discrimination is accompanied by restlessness, conjoined with restlessness, that is called overly active discrimination.

And how is discrimination inwardly constricted? Whatever discrimination is accompanied by sloth & drowsiness, conjoined with sloth & drowsiness, that is called inwardly restricted discrimination.

And how is discrimination outwardly scattered? Whatever discrimination is stirred up by the five strands of sensuality, outwardly dispersed & dissipated, that is called outwardly scattered discrimination.

Ṭhānissaro Bhikkhu translation of hindrance section from:
An Analysis of the Bases of Power
Iddhipāda-Vibhaṅga Sutta  (SN 51:20) https://www.dhammatalks.org/suttas/SN/SN51_20.html

Or translated:

And what is enthusiasm [chanda] that’s too lax? It’s when enthusiasm is combined with laziness. This is called lax enthusiasm.

And what is enthusiasm that’s too tense? It’s when enthusiasm is combined with restlessness. This is called tense enthusiasm.

And what is enthusiasm that’s constricted internally?
It’s when enthusiasm is combined with dullness and drowsiness. This is called enthusiasm constricted internally.

And what is enthusiasm that’s distracted externally?
It’s when enthusiasm is frequently distracted and diffused externally on account of the five kinds of sensual stimulation. This is called enthusiasm distracted externally.

And what is energy [viriya] that’s too lax? It’s when energy is combined with laziness. This is called lax energy.

And what is energy that’s too tense? It’s when energy is combined with restlessness. This is called tense energy.

And what is energy that’s constricted internally?
It’s when energy is combined with dullness and drowsiness. This is called energy constricted internally.

And what is energy that’s distracted externally?
It’s when energy is frequently distracted and diffused externally on account of the five kinds of sensual stimulation. This is called energy distracted externally.

And what is mental development [citta] that’s too lax? It’s when mental development is combined with laziness. This is called lax mental development.

And what is mental development that’s too tense? It’s when mental development is combined with restlessness. This is called tense mental development.

And what is mental development that’s constricted internally?
It’s when mental development is combined with dullness and drowsiness. This is called mental development constricted internally.

And what is mental development that’s distracted externally?
It’s when mental development is frequently distracted and diffused externally on account of the five kinds of sensual stimulation. This is called mental development distracted externally.

And what is inquiry [vīmaṃsā] that’s too lax? It’s when inquiry is combined with laziness. This is called lax inquiry.

And what is inquiry that’s too tense? It’s when inquiry is combined with restlessness. This is called tense inquiry.

And what is inquiry that’s constricted internally?
It’s when inquiry is combined with dullness and drowsiness. This is called inquiry constricted internally.

And what is inquiry that’s distracted externally?
It’s when inquiry is frequently distracted and diffused externally on account of the five kinds of sensual stimulation. This is called inquiry distracted externally.

Bhante Sujato translation of hindrance section from:
Linked Discourses 51
2. Shaking the Stilt Longhouse
20. Analysis
https://suttacentral.net/sn51.20/en/sujato

If anyone else was wondering, the first part of Maha-dukkhakkhandha Sutta: The Great Mass of Stress describes the five strands of sensuality, or sensual stimulation:

Now what, monks, is the allure of sensuality? These five strings of sensuality. Which five? Forms cognizable via the eye — agreeable, pleasing, charming, endearing, fostering desire, enticing. Sounds cognizable via the ear… Aromas cognizable via the nose… Flavors cognizable via the tongue… Tactile sensations cognizable via the body — agreeable, pleasing, charming, endearing, fostering desire, enticing. Now whatever pleasure or joy arises in dependence on these five strands of sensuality, that is the allure of sensuality.

via https://buddhism.stackexchange.com/questions/22744/what-are-the-5-cords-of-sensual-pleasures [I added bold text to emphasize each of the five stands]

And a line-by-line look at the Pali for the hindrances (for chanda) :

And what is enthusiasm that’s too lax?

Katamo ca, bhikkhave, atilīno chando?

It’s when enthusiasm is combined with laziness.

Yo, bhikkhave, chando kosajjasahagato kosajjasampayutto—

This is called lax enthusiasm.

ayaṁ vuccati, bhikkhave, atilīno chando.

And what is enthusiasm that’s too tense?

Katamo ca, bhikkhave, atippaggahito chando?

It’s when enthusiasm is combined with restlessness.

Yo, bhikkhave, chando uddhaccasahagato uddhaccasampayutto—

This is called tense enthusiasm.

ayaṁ vuccati, bhikkhave, atippaggahito chando.

And what is enthusiasm that’s constricted internally?

Katamo ca, bhikkhave, ajjhattaṁ saṅkhitto chando?

It’s when enthusiasm is combined with dullness and drowsiness.

Yo, bhikkhave, chando thinamiddhasahagato thina­middha­sampayutto­—

This is called enthusiasm constricted internally.

ayaṁ vuccati, bhikkhave, ajjhattaṁ saṅkhitto chando.

And what is enthusiasm that’s distracted externally?

Katamo ca, bhikkhave, bahiddhā vikkhitto chando?

It’s when enthusiasm is frequently distracted and diffused externally on account of the five kinds of sensual stimulation.

Yo, bhikkhave, chando bahiddhā pañca kāmaguṇe ārabbha anuvikkhitto anuvisaṭo—

This is called enthusiasm distracted externally.

ayaṁ vuccati, bhikkhave, bahiddhā vikkhitto chando.

from https://suttacentral.net/sn51.20/en/sujato?layout=linebyline&reference=none&notes=sidenotes&highlight=false&script=latin

It seems there are only four types of paired hindrances here:

  1. sluggishness/laziness
  2. overly active/restlessness
  3. inward constriction/sloth & torpor
  4. outwardly scattered/five strands of sensuality

This compared to the traditional five hindrances:

  1. Sensory desire (kāmacchanda)
  2. Ill-will (vyāpāda; also spelled byāpāda)
  3. Restlessness-and-worry (uddhacca-kukkucca)
  4. Sloth-and-torpor (thīna-middha)
  5. Doubt (vicikiccha)

I’m guessing ill-will and doubt are left out in The Iddhipāda-Vibhaṅga Sutta because these don’t seem to come into play much for practitioners at this level working on such developments as laid out in this sutta.

So the hindrances here seem to be paired in two ways:

  • as excessive energy and a lack of energy
  • (and this is) delineated internally and externally

Speculative consideration: How about treating these hindrances with the opposite hindrance? Like a scale tipping too far to one side, would employing (at least a little of) the opposite hindrance act as a counter balance? Would this just create twice as many hindrances? Or even go so far as to cancel each other out? Or, what about something like using the opposite hindrance to help make a U-turn from a predominating hindrance? For example using “overly sluggish” to turn around “overly active”?

The buddha was kind of big on effort

I’m guessing one need not develop the Iddhipādas — or bases of power “endowed with concentration founded on desire, persistence, intent, and discernment and the fabrications of exertion” — to the point of jhana or concentrative absorption. According to some, one’s ability to act (externally) is limited while in jhana. If so, could (developing) jhanas using the Iddhipādas as mentioned in this sutta — with psychic development sometimes occurring along with practicing the jhanas by themselves, in their own right — be a kind of detriment that would not allow the “psychic abilities” mentioned herewithin? How ought we consider the jhanas in this context?

Since “fabrications of exertion” exist — as in “. . . develops the base of power endowed with concentration founded on desire & the fabrications of exertion. . .” — are the mentioned hindrances then also fabrications? If so, why and how do the hindrances become fabricated? How do they become unfabricated to the point of nonexistence rather than unfabricated into reality? Could hindrances come to be (allowed) because of exertions due to the law of polarity — i.e., if there’s energy and effort put into eliminating hindrances then does this reinforce the existence of hindrances themselves? And if so, did the law of polarity differ in the time of the Buddha? Are there any differences today significantly affecting how to skillfully address hindrances compared to the time of the Buddha?


Audio: Studying And Practicing With “The Iddhipāda-Vibhaṅga Sutta — An Analysis Of The Bases Of Power”: Unpacking Hindrances And Another Translation Reading (2 of 7)


Full Bhante Sujato translation of The Iddhipāda-Vibhaṅga Sutta:

“Mendicants, when the four bases of psychic power are developed and cultivated they’re very fruitful and beneficial.

How so?
It’s when a mendicant develops the basis of psychic power that has immersion due to enthusiasm, and active effort.
They think: ‘My enthusiasm won’t be too lax or too tense. And it’ll be neither constricted internally nor scattered externally.’
And they meditate perceiving continuity:
as before, so after; as after, so before;
as below, so above; as above, so below;
as by day, so by night; as by night, so by day.
And so, with an open and unenveloped heart, they develop a mind that’s full of radiance.

They develop the basis of psychic power that has immersion due to energy, and active effort.
They think: ‘My energy won’t be too lax or too tense. And it’ll be neither constricted internally nor scattered externally.’
And they meditate perceiving continuity:
as before, so after; as after, so before;
as below, so above; as above, so below;
as by day, so by night; as by night, so by day.
And so, with an open and unenveloped heart, they develop a mind that’s full of radiance.

They develop the basis of psychic power that has immersion due to mental development, and active effort.
They think: ‘My mental development won’t be too lax or too tense. And it’ll be neither constricted internally nor scattered externally.’
And they meditate perceiving continuity:
as before, so after; as after, so before;
as below, so above; as above, so below;
as by day, so by night; as by night, so by day.
And so, with an open and unenveloped heart, they develop a mind that’s full of radiance.

They develop the basis of psychic power that has immersion due to inquiry, and active effort.
They think: ‘My inquiry won’t be too lax or too tense. And it’ll be neither constricted internally nor scattered externally.’
And they meditate perceiving continuity:
as before, so after; as after, so before;
as below, so above; as above, so below;
as by day, so by night; as by night, so by day.
And so, with an open and unenveloped heart, they develop a mind that’s full of radiance.

And what is enthusiasm [chanda] that’s too lax?
It’s when enthusiasm is combined with laziness.
This is called lax enthusiasm.

And what is enthusiasm that’s too tense?
It’s when enthusiasm is combined with restlessness.
This is called tense enthusiasm.

And what is enthusiasm that’s constricted internally?
It’s when enthusiasm is combined with dullness and drowsiness.
This is called enthusiasm constricted internally.

And what is enthusiasm that’s distracted externally?
It’s when enthusiasm is frequently distracted and diffused externally on account of the five kinds of sensual stimulation.
This is called enthusiasm distracted externally.

And how does a mendicant meditate perceiving continuity:
as before, so after; as after, so before?
It’s when the perception of continuity is properly grasped, attended, borne in mind, and comprehended with wisdom by a mendicant.
That’s how a mendicant meditates perceiving continuity:
as before, so after; as after, so before.

And how does a mendicant meditate as below, so above; as above, so below?
It’s when a mendicant examines their own body up from the soles of the feet and down from the tips of the hairs, wrapped in skin and full of many kinds of filth.
‘In this body there is head hair, body hair, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, sinews, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, diaphragm, spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, undigested food, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, snot, synovial fluid, urine.’
That’s how a mendicant meditates as below, so above; as above, so below.

And how does a mendicant meditate as by day, so by night; as by night, so by day?
It’s when a mendicant develops the basis of psychic power that has immersion due to enthusiasm [chanda], and active effort, with the same features, attributes, and signs by day as by night.
And they develop it with the same features, attributes, and signs by night as by day.
That’s how a mendicant meditates as by day, so by night; as by night, so by day.

And how, with an open and unenveloped heart, does a mendicant develop a mind that’s full of radiance?
It’s when a mendicant has properly grasped the perception of light, and has properly grasped the perception of day.
That’s how, with an open and unenveloped heart, a mendicant develops a mind that’s full of radiance.

And what is energy [viriya] that’s too lax?
It’s when energy is combined with laziness.
This is called lax energy.

And what is energy that’s too tense?
It’s when energy is combined with restlessness.
This is called tense energy.

And what is energy that’s constricted internally?
It’s when energy is combined with dullness and drowsiness.
This is called energy constricted internally.

And what is energy that’s distracted externally?
It’s when energy is frequently distracted and diffused externally on account of the five kinds of sensual stimulation.
This is called energy distracted externally.

And how does a mendicant meditate perceiving continuity:
as before, so after; as after, so before?
It’s when the perception of continuity is properly grasped, attended, borne in mind, and comprehended with wisdom by a mendicant.
That’s how a mendicant meditates perceiving continuity:
as before, so after; as after, so before.

And how does a mendicant meditate as below, so above; as above, so below?
It’s when a mendicant examines their own body up from the soles of the feet and down from the tips of the hairs, wrapped in skin and full of many kinds of filth.
‘In this body there is head hair, body hair, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, sinews, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, diaphragm, spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, undigested food, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, snot, synovial fluid, urine.’
That’s how a mendicant meditates as below, so above; as above, so below.

And how does a mendicant meditate as by day, so by night; as by night, so by day?
It’s when a mendicant develops the basis of psychic power that has immersion due to energy [viriya], and active effort, with the same features, attributes, and signs by day as by night.
And they develop it with the same features, attributes, and signs by night as by day.
That’s how a mendicant meditates as by day, so by night; as by night, so by day.

And how, with an open and unenveloped heart, does a mendicant develop a mind that’s full of radiance?
It’s when a mendicant has properly grasped the perception of light, and has properly grasped the perception of day.
That’s how, with an open and unenveloped heart, a mendicant develops a mind that’s full of radiance.

And what is mental development [citta] that’s too lax?
It’s when mental development is combined with laziness.
This is called lax mental development.

And what is mental development that’s too tense?
It’s when mental development is combined with restlessness.
This is called tense mental development.

And what is mental development that’s constricted internally?
It’s when mental development is combined with dullness and drowsiness.
This is called mental development constricted internally.

And what is mental development that’s distracted externally?
It’s when mental development is frequently distracted and diffused externally on account of the five kinds of sensual stimulation.
This is called mental development distracted externally.

And how does a mendicant meditate perceiving continuity:
as before, so after; as after, so before?
It’s when the perception of continuity is properly grasped, attended, borne in mind, and comprehended with wisdom by a mendicant.
That’s how a mendicant meditates perceiving continuity:
as before, so after; as after, so before.

And how does a mendicant meditate as below, so above; as above, so below?
It’s when a mendicant examines their own body up from the soles of the feet and down from the tips of the hairs, wrapped in skin and full of many kinds of filth.
‘In this body there is head hair, body hair, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, sinews, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, diaphragm, spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, undigested food, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, snot, synovial fluid, urine.’
That’s how a mendicant meditates as below, so above; as above, so below.

And how does a mendicant meditate as by day, so by night; as by night, so by day?
It’s when a mendicant develops the basis of psychic power that has immersion due to mental development [citta], and active effort, with the same features, attributes, and signs by day as by night.
And they develop it with the same features, attributes, and signs by night as by day.
That’s how a mendicant meditates as by day, so by night; as by night, so by day.

And how, with an open and unenveloped heart, does a mendicant develop a mind that’s full of radiance?
It’s when a mendicant has properly grasped the perception of light, and has properly grasped the perception of day.
That’s how, with an open and unenveloped heart, a mendicant develops a mind that’s full of radiance.

And what is inquiry [vīmaṃsā] that’s too lax?
It’s when inquiry is combined with laziness.
This is called lax inquiry.

And what is inquiry that’s too tense?
It’s when inquiry is combined with restlessness.
This is called tense inquiry.

And what is inquiry that’s constricted internally?
It’s when inquiry is combined with dullness and drowsiness.
This is called inquiry constricted internally.

And what is inquiry that’s distracted externally?
It’s when inquiry is frequently distracted and diffused externally on account of the five kinds of sensual stimulation.
This is called inquiry distracted externally.

And how does a mendicant meditate perceiving continuity:
as before, so after; as after, so before?
It’s when the perception of continuity is properly grasped, attended, borne in mind, and comprehended with wisdom by a mendicant.
That’s how a mendicant meditates perceiving continuity:
as before, so after; as after, so before.

And how does a mendicant meditate as below, so above; as above, so below?
It’s when a mendicant examines their own body up from the soles of the feet and down from the tips of the hairs, wrapped in skin and full of many kinds of filth.
‘In this body there is head hair, body hair, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, sinews, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, diaphragm, spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, undigested food, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, snot, synovial fluid, urine.’
That’s how a mendicant meditates as below, so above; as above, so below.

And how does a mendicant meditate as by day, so by night; as by night, so by day?
It’s when a mendicant develops the basis of psychic power that has immersion due to inquiry [vīmaṃsā], and active effort, with the same features, attributes, and signs by day as by night.
And they develop it with the same features, attributes, and signs by night as by day.
That’s how a mendicant meditates as by day, so by night; as by night, so by day.

And how, with an open and unenveloped heart, does a mendicant develop a mind that’s full of radiance?
It’s when a mendicant has properly grasped the perception of light, and has properly grasped the perception of day.
That’s how, with an open and unenveloped heart, a mendicant develops a mind that’s full of radiance.

When the four bases of psychic power have been developed and cultivated in this way they’re very fruitful and beneficial.

When the four bases of psychic power have been developed and cultivated in this way, they wield the many kinds of psychic power: multiplying themselves and becoming one again; appearing and disappearing; going unimpeded through a wall, a rampart, or a mountain as if through space; diving in and out of the earth as if it were water; walking on water as if it were earth; flying cross-legged through the sky like a bird; touching and stroking with the hand the sun and moon, so mighty and powerful; controlling the body as far as the Brahmā realm.

[Integrating Presence note: beginning of portion perhaps left out of this sutta but included in others where the psychic powers are repeated with the same language:]

With clairaudience that is purified and superhuman, they hear both kinds of sounds, human and divine, whether near or far.

They understand the minds of other beings and individuals, having comprehended them with their own mind. They understand mind with greed as ‘mind with greed’, and mind without greed as ‘mind without greed’. They understand mind with hate as ‘mind with hate’, and mind without hate as ‘mind without hate’. They understand mind with delusion as ‘mind with delusion’, and mind without delusion as ‘mind without delusion’. They understand constricted mind as ‘constricted mind’, and scattered mind as ‘scattered mind’. They understand expansive mind as ‘expansive mind’, and unexpansive mind as ‘unexpansive mind’. They understand mind that is not supreme as ‘mind that is not supreme’, and mind that is supreme as ‘mind that is supreme’. They understand mind immersed in samādhi as ‘mind immersed in samādhi’, and mind not immersed in samādhi as ‘mind not immersed in samādhi’. They understand freed mind as ‘freed mind’, and they understand unfreed mind as ‘unfreed mind’.

They recollect many kinds of past lives. That is: one, two, three, four, five, ten, twenty, thirty, forty, fifty, a hundred, a thousand, a hundred thousand rebirths; many eons of the world contracting, many eons of the world expanding, many eons of the world contracting and expanding. They remember: ‘There, I was named this, my clan was that, I looked like this, and that was my food. This was how I felt pleasure and pain, and that was how my life ended. When I passed away from that place I was reborn somewhere else. There, too, I was named this, my clan was that, I looked like this, and that was my food. This was how I felt pleasure and pain, and that was how my life ended. When I passed away from that place I was reborn here.’ And so they recollect their many kinds of past lives, with features and details.

With clairvoyance that is purified and superhuman, they see sentient beings passing away and being reborn—inferior and superior, beautiful and ugly, in a good place or a bad place. They understand how sentient beings are reborn according to their deeds: ‘These dear beings did bad things by way of body, speech, and mind. They spoke ill of the noble ones; they had wrong view; and they acted out of that wrong view. When their body breaks up, after death, they’re reborn in a place of loss, a bad place, the underworld, hell. These dear beings, however, did good things by way of body, speech, and mind. They never spoke ill of the noble ones; they had right view; and they acted out of that right view. When their body breaks up, after death, they’re reborn in a good place, a heavenly realm.’ And so, with clairvoyance that is purified and superhuman, they see sentient beings passing away and being reborn—inferior and superior, beautiful and ugly, in a good place or a bad place. They understand how sentient beings are reborn according to their deeds.

[end of portion perhaps left out of this sutta]

When the four bases of psychic power have been developed and cultivated in this way, they realize the undefiled freedom of heart and freedom by wisdom in this very life. And they live having realized it with their own insight due to the ending of defilements.”

[Please reach out with any corrections and suggestions for my inclusion(/guesses) of expanding/extending/filling in the omitted redundant text indicated by “…” from:]
Linked Discourses 51
2. Shaking the Stilt Longhouse
20. Analysis
https://suttacentral.net/sn51.20/en/sujato

[Technical note: I said in part one I had recorded everything, however, apparently I had not recorded (reading) this translation at that time]



Bonus translation: Piya Tan translation of The Iddhipāda-Vibhaṅga Sutta — The Discourse on the Analysis of the Bases of Spiritual Success [pdf]

Published by josh dippold

IntegratingPresence.com

2 thoughts on “Podcast | Studying And Practicing With “The Iddhipāda-Vibhaṅga Sutta — An Analysis Of The Bases Of Power”: Unpacking Hindrances And Another Translation Reading (2 of 7)

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