American Buddhism | (10/27/2020 — “Ask Us Anything” with Denny K Miu)

For this month’s open-audience, open-discussion “Ask Us Anything” — continuing discussions about meditation and related topics — Denny and I expand from last month’s chat on “Hīnayāna” as a superlative and more on Theravada and Mahayana in general. We also get into:

On one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi, in Jeta’s Grove, Anathapindika‘s monastery. Then Rohitassa, the son of a deva, in the far extreme of the night, his extreme radiance lighting up the entirety of Jeta’s Grove, went to the Blessed One. On arrival, having bowed down to the Blessed One, he stood to one side. As he was standing there he said to the Blessed One: “Is it possible, lord, by traveling, to know or see or reach a far end of the cosmos where one does not take birth, age, die, pass away or reappear?”

“I tell you, friend, that it is not possible by traveling to know or see or reach a far end of the cosmos where one does not take birth, age, die, pass away, or reappear.”

“It is amazing, lord, and awesome, how well that has been said by the Blessed One: ‘I tell you, friend, that it is not possible by traveling to know or see or reach a far end of the cosmos where one does not take birth, age, die, pass away, or reappear.’ Once I was a seer named Rohitassa, a student of Bhoja, a powerful sky-walker. My speed was as fast as that of a strong archer — well-trained, a practiced hand, a practiced sharp-shooter — shooting a light arrow across the shadow of a palm tree. My stride stretched as far as the east sea is from the west. To me, endowed with such speed, such a stride, there came the desire: ‘I will go traveling to the end of the cosmos.’ I — with a one-hundred year life, a one-hundred year span — spent one hundred years traveling — apart from the time spent on eating, drinking, chewing & tasting, urinating & defecating, and sleeping to fight off weariness — but without reaching the end of the cosmos I died along the way. So it is amazing, lord, and awesome, how well that has been said by the Blessed One: ‘I tell you, friend, that it is not possible by traveling to know or see or reach a far end of the cosmos where one does not take birth, age, die, pass away, or reappear.'”

[When this was said, the Blessed One responded:] “I tell you, friend, that it is not possible by traveling to know or see or reach a far end of the cosmos where one does not take birth, age, die, pass away, or reappear. But at the same time, I tell you that there is no making an end of suffering & stress without reaching the end of the cosmos. Yet it is just within this fathom-long body, with its perception & intellect, that I declare that there is the cosmos, the origination of the cosmos, the cessation of the cosmos, and the path of practice leading to the cessation of the cosmos.” It’s not to be reached by traveling, the end of the cosmos — regardless. And it’s not without reaching the end of the cosmos that there is release from suffering & stress. So, truly, the wise one, an expert with regard to the cosmos, a knower of the end of the cosmos, having fulfilled the holy life, calmed, knowing the cosmos’ end, doesn’t long for this cosmos or for any other.

  • Buddhism in America in reference to Buddhism in Asia
  • Distinctions between belief/disbelief, information, reference points, data, facts, histories, etc.
  • The “Pizza Effect
  • Ehipassiko – Investigate & See for Yourself
  • Confusion and bullheadedness surrounding “Vipassana” as technique; a way of learning; as a concept; etc
  • Bodhisattva vow of “save all beings” better translated as “guiding others”
  • Identity politics and xenophobia
  • Parable of the Burning House in the Lotus Sutra where (the three) “yana” (or vehicles) is said to derive from
  • The first and second Buddhist councils
    • Upali and Ānanda at first council
    • Various Buddhist positions on female monastics
    • Anagarikas in the Thai forest tradition
    • 10 points of controversy
      1. Storing salt in a horn.
      2. Eating after midday.
      3. Eating once and then going again to a village for alms.
      4. Holding the Uposatha Ceremony with monks dwelling in the same locality.
      5. Carrying out official acts when the assembly was incomplete.
      6. Following a certain practice because it was done by one’s tutor or teacher.
      7. Eating sour milk after one had his midday meal.
      8. Consuming strong drink before it had been fermented.
      9. Using a rug which was not the proper size.
      10. Using gold and silver.

Join “Ask Us Anything LIVE” next month, February 23, 2021 at noon Central Time via:

Facebook [custom link redirecting to Facebook Live: dennykmiu.com/facebook]

Published by josh dippold

IntegratingPresence.com

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